Wild West Hackin’ Fest: Affordable and Content-Heavy

John Strand, who owns Black Hills Information Security (BHIS), has a way clearing the fog of what passes for knowledge in the security industry. And he knows how to make his audiences laugh. It’s a kind of cathartic truth-laugh that brings people together. I remember the first time I heard him plug the Wild West Hackin’ Fest (WWHF). I made a mental note. This could be a good, small conference that offers a lot of value. Of course, I knew that there was a lot more to BHIS than its owner, but you can often tell the culture of events from the folks who run them.

So last summer, on our family vacation, I did some recon. We managed to stay a couple nights in Deadwood. Perfect chance to inspect the venue and get a good sense of what a conference here might be like. Yup, I could definitely see this: a security conference in Deadwood.

Not long after that trip I made plans to go. And I convinced a colleague to come with me. It wasn’t fancy. Don’t get me wrong. The Deadwood Mountain Grand Hotel was awesome, but the bulk of the sessions were basically in two large rooms and a stage, which were really part of one large room divided by curtains. But here’s the thing. I don’t need fancy. I need content. And that’s what we got. Session after session was loaded with content.

I remember a talk by Paul Vixie, one of the creators of DNS, that completely tied me in to the importance of DNS. And another talk by Jon Ham where his passion for forensics made me feel like there was a whole world that I’d been skipping over in my infosec career development. And Jake Williams was there too. His session was on privilege escalation. And I was like, “Wait, what?” — an eye opener indeed. Also memorable was a talk by Annah Waggoner. It was her first talk and she was inspirational. Doing a talk for the first time at an event like WWHF has to take courage. Which is another thing, WWHF is great about pushing, encouraging folks to present, especially those who haven’t done it before.

I’m not going to rehash every talk, but I do want to encourage people to go to this event. I’m very excited about going again this year! If you want an affordable, content-heavy, hands-on experience, Deadwood in October is the time and place for you!

https://www.wildwesthackinfest.com

How can you be a consultant in your own organzation?

We’ve all seen it, especially folks who work in IT, or any area where things are changing faster than they ever have been. We hire consultants to bring value, and they often do, but often not as much as we expect them to.

Just like anyone in our departments, these folks have their specialties and they don’t know everything about everything. The resulting gaps in knowledge can create painful obstacles on the way toward successful project completion. These are the “we don’t know what we don’t know” gaps. Knowledge gaps are challenging, but they also present huge opportunities.

Identifying knowledge gaps and diving into them head first is critical. You don’t know what you don’t know until you start asking yourself what you don’t know. I know, sounds dumb, but that’s where you have to start. If there is no one in your organization who can answer your questions or who can bring value to a high-demand subject area, then it’s time to start diving, digging, reading, watching, learning, asking, etc. This can mean reading books, experimenting with technology, and generally getting out of your comfort zone.

Sure, it’s a lot of work, but if you’re not doing this work, you’re not bringing value to yourself or your organization. As you start to dig, you’re bringing value to yourself because there are few things more rewarding than learning, and then sharing what you’ve learned. You’re bringing value to organization because they don’t know what they don’t know.

I get it, this process isn’t for everyone. All I’m saying is that the knowledge gap problem is solvable. No training budget? Okay, well, there is seriously more information online than you seriously digest in a billion lifetimes. Don’t know how to cull through that information? Well, you won’t know how until you start pushing yourself to sort it out. And the thing with learning is that once you learn something, it’s hard to feel like you’ve made any progress because now you know it and it doesn’t seem like a big deal. So don’t forget to take stock of the things you’re learning. You know more today than you did yesterday!

Also, a big part of learning is sharing what you’ve learned, even if it is nearly immediately after you’ve learned it. It’s like when you share knowledge, the knowledge you share finds a home in your brain.

The more you teach and share, the more you become a consultant in your own organization. You don’t know everything, but neither do your consultants!