Picking the right words to describe cloud assets is kind of important

The work of any given IT department is remarkably broad. And within each functional team, vocabularies around technology can be quite unique. This is fine when different groups don’t have to work together much, but when they get together to solve problems, one great challenge has to do with making sure specific IT terms mean the same thing to everyone.

And if that isn’t challenging enough, take traditional IT terms and then figure out how they all translate into the ‘cloud’. I’ll give an example. Take the distinction between IaaS and PaaS. The way this is often described is that with PaaS you don’t have to worry about patching an operating system. With IaaS, this is the customers’ responsibility, not the cloud service provider’s. But the scope of cloud is much bigger than the VM example. And not understanding this can have serious ramifications.

Let’s say you go out into cloud console for your tenant. (This would be the place where you log in to spin up a virtual machine, for example.) Whether you like it or not, the very moment you spin up a VM in the cloud you’ve created the beginnings of a network topology. Not knowing this can cost you dearly later.

Cloud infrastructure is not just VM’s. There’s a whole world of storage, networking and compute services, too, which we often overlook as being IaaS. Why does this matter? Because knowing and understanding this is also the beginning of securing it. Consider where each of these pieces live in a traditional on-prem model, and what controls are in place to protect the confidentiality, integrity and accessibility of these assets. That same diligence has to be transferred to the cloud. For example, protecting your firewall configurations is not unlike protecting your security group configs on a subnet or VM instance.

Also, how do you track changes to these assets? Whatever diligence you apply in traditional IT models, this same diligence is required in the cloud. This includes reviewing and validating configurations on these virtual assets. Think about what would happen if any one of these virtual assets, like a subnet or a whole virtual network were to be deleted. Where would you be and what controls do you have in place to keep this from happening? And in the unfortunate case that it does happen, how would you know how it happened and who did it?

Because it is so much easier to set up infrastructure in the cloud, it is also that much easier to abuse said infrastructure either intentionally or unintentionally. Getting everyone on the same page around the vocabulary for cloud infrastructure is the beginning of fully understanding how to secure this environment. Let’s decide on our critical cloud vocabulary and make sure we all share the same deep understanding of the words we use to describe this environment.