Cybersecurity Risk and a Cadence of Communication

Risk is everywhere. What’s the probability that something bad will happen? And when it does happen, how bad will it be? For folks who work in security these are questions we ask every day, all day.

But it doesn’t stop there. After we get done asking these questions, we have to artfully communicate our approximations to decision makers. Sometimes this works. Mostly it doesn’t.

Part of the challenge is that our calculation of risk involves technology and gobs of technical know-how; the kind of in-the-weeds technical know-how that most business folks don’t find particularly useful. So there’s a translation process. As we translate, the meat of our risk evaluations can get lost. And decision makers don’t have time to get up to speed.

So herein lies the challenge. The business makes risk decisions, like, all the time, but since technological or security risk is hard to understand, they aren’t always arriving at their decision destination with the right knowledge. It a reasonable enough to suggest that they can be informed enough to make the right decisions?

I’d say it is. But we can’t have the presumption that a single email or a short briefing will suffice. It order to make communication around risk work, there should be a cadence of communication. It should not be the first time that a decision-maker is hearing about a given risk. Security pros can help decision makers build up a baseline of risk seen in a given environment so that when a risk report does surface, it actually means something. Without regular context for these types of reports, they’re just empty words. It security they may mean something, but that’s as far as the meaning goes.

How can you develop a cadence of communication within your organization?