How can you be a consultant in your own organzation?

We’ve all seen it, especially folks who work in IT, or any area where things are changing faster than they ever have been. We hire consultants to bring value, and they often do, but often not as much as we expect them to.

Just like anyone in our departments, these folks have their specialties and they don’t know everything about everything. The resulting gaps in knowledge can create painful obstacles on the way toward successful project completion. These are the “we don’t know what we don’t know” gaps. Knowledge gaps are challenging, but they also present huge opportunities.

Identifying knowledge gaps and diving into them head first is critical. You don’t know what you don’t know until you start asking yourself what you don’t know. I know, sounds dumb, but that’s where you have to start. If there is no one in your organization who can answer your questions or who can bring value to a high-demand subject area, then it’s time to start diving, digging, reading, watching, learning, asking, etc. This can mean reading books, experimenting with technology, and generally getting out of your comfort zone.

Sure, it’s a lot of work, but if you’re not doing this work, you’re not bringing value to yourself or your organization. As you start to dig, you’re bringing value to yourself because there are few things more rewarding than learning, and then sharing what you’ve learned. You’re bringing value to organization because they don’t know what they don’t know.

I get it, this process isn’t for everyone. All I’m saying is that the knowledge gap problem is solvable. No training budget? Okay, well, there is seriously more information online than you seriously digest in a billion lifetimes. Don’t know how to cull through that information? Well, you won’t know how until you start pushing yourself to sort it out. And the thing with learning is that once you learn something, it’s hard to feel like you’ve made any progress because now you know it and it doesn’t seem like a big deal. So don’t forget to take stock of the things you’re learning. You know more today than you did yesterday!

Also, a big part of learning is sharing what you’ve learned, even if it is nearly immediately after you’ve learned it. It’s like when you share knowledge, the knowledge you share finds a home in your brain.

The more you teach and share, the more you become a consultant in your own organization. You don’t know everything, but neither do your consultants!