Study both AWS and Azure for High-level Cloud Understanding

Recently, I’ve found it’s not enough to simply say, “I’m an AWS person” or “I’m an Azure person” when it comes to learning and understanding the cloud. The greatest benefits in learning surface from seeking a high-level understanding of cloud platforms, in general.

These two leading cloud providers, AWS and Azure, are distinct enough from each other, but fundamentally there are features that neither of them can avoid if they are going maintain market share, or simply be able to provide viable solutions to their customers.

When folks spin up a VM instance at AWS or in the Azure portal, they are likely to overlook a few critical things. 1) These environments are networks unto themselves, 2) Where you might’ve been operating a private cloud in the past, which is essentially a traditional data center, you’re now using a public cloud, and 3) Where you might envision you’re life getting simpler with cloud, it’s actually getting more complicated.

When folks spin up a VM instance at AWS or in the Azure portal, they are likely to overlook a few critical things. 1) These environments are networks unto themselves, 2) Where you might’ve been operating a private cloud in the past, which is essentially a traditional data center, you’re now using a public cloud, and 3) Where you might envision you’re life getting simpler with cloud, it’s actually getting more complicated.

With point #1, AWS and Azure both provide ways for their customers to create networks. There may be slight differences in how these networks are set up, but the concepts are the same. Azure calls theirs virtual networks and AWS describes them as virtual private cloud or VPC instances. (Oracle calls theirs virtual cloud network or VCNs.)

Call it what you want, it is a network. And if you don’t know that, you’re likely in for a world of hurt later when you need to scale or secure your cloud environment. And if you can’t do the same thing in AWS as you do Azure on this front, then you don’t really understand the fundamentals. And if you try another cloud platform and find you simply can’t fine tune networks the way you like, then you’ll know why AWS and Azure are leaving them behind.

With point #2, you are now participating in the use of a public data center. This means it is exceedingly easy to expose your services in ways you maybe didn’t intend. Take a careful look at how AWS and Azure overlap or don’t overlap in their approach to exposing services. If you only ever had you head in AWS you might assume that certain settings are always set to be public and the same might be true of Azure.

They’re both evolving from month to month on their approach to how they handle default public exposure, so I won’t go into too much detail. But if you work with them simultaneously when you’re learning, you’ll make fewer assumptions and as more critical questions than you would otherwise.

With point #3, generally speaking, your life as an IT professional who uses the cloud to build IT infrastructure, services and to take advantage of pre-built applications, is about to get a bit more complicated. Why? Because now in addition to all the systems you need to support locally, which help you move data in an out of the cloud, you need to manage the cloud as well. And if you’re using a service that “manages itself” you need to manage perpetual change just to keep up with it.

Understanding integration in both AWS and Azure will help you make fewer assumptions about the way things should be and, again, think critically about the fact that much of the design is actually up to you. You can’t afford to turn of your critical thinking skills. Having the courage to ask tough questions is even more important than it has been in the past. So if someone asks you, should I learn AWS or Azure, or (name your favorite alternative), the answer should be “yes”. There is no “or” if you’re going to be the master of your own cloud destiny. 🙂

“Sapiens” and Economic Value

To some extent, Economics is the study of how people produce more (both variation and volume) when they work together. Most of the time people have a place in the world’s economy when they provide value, which is measured by money and credit…mostly.

The book “Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind” by Yuval Noah Harari has me thinking differently about economics. Harari takes us into critical transitions in human history; like the years just before and after the invention of “credit”. According to Harari, “credit” is anchored in the belief that the future will be better than the past. For most of human history, people assumed the reverse. The future was no match for the glory of the past.

Once credit took hold, however, both for good and ill, it allowed for a greater and more frequent transfer of value. Humanity could start to build a future together. And value could begin to be sought out in all corners of the globe. Trade and credit meant that we could do more together. And the more humans worked together to produce what they needed (or wanted) the more the economy grew. With all the benefits of economic growth, humans also witnessed exploitation and abuse of this system. Individuals and institutions figured out how to steal value from others who weren’t in a position to know better or defend themselves.

Unfortunately, trading on stolen value still happens today. But in the greater scheme of things, I find myself wondering about how we’re going to manage value and economic growth in the future. We’re moving from exploiting people to simply eliminating them from the equation all together. If people are not providing direct value to the global economy, will they be able to participate? Will there be huge swaths of people who can’t take advantage of all the value being created because they won’t have anything to offer in exchange for it?

Think of the countries or societies that are generating value and those that aren’t. Countries that don’t generate value fall victim to crime and exploitation. The further they get from full participation in the global economy, the further they get from the benefits of modern society. Disproportionately they end up on the downside of the world’s value systems.

As a result, with no value accessible to them, citizens in these countries migrate toward countries where value is accessible; where they have a chance of participating and producing value of their own. These value destinations, however, have responded by restricting their borders. Also, they attempt to control the flow of value by forcing their hand in trade deals. But these kinds of restrictions are antithetical to what actually makes a global economy work in the first place. We generate value when we work together.

Sure, there’s competition, but ultimately the real wins happen when we engage countries and societies who have been left out. And we all win when we help them generate value. The more overall participation we get, the better we’ll all be. Both because we’ll benefit from what these countries have to offer and because they won’t become feeders for crime and violence.