‘The Cloud’ is Still New

It feels like folks have been talking about ‘the cloud’ forever. But levels of cloud utilization in the form of IaaS, PaaS, etc. have really only ramped up significantly in the last couple years. The tendency is to think that there are ‘cloud’ people who were just born knowing ‘cloud’ and that the chasm between ‘cloud’ and ‘on-prem’ is so great that the ‘on-prem’ folks simply won’t understand this new realm.

Fact is, ‘the cloud’ is still new. And no one is born knowing anything, especially not best-practices around cloud utilization, security, and architecture. Herein lies both risk and opportunity. If we can all just put down our pretensions around cloud know-how and get busy learning, we might actually be able to build, configure and secure our cloud environments in a way that delivers consistent, beautiful results.

But the first step is remind ourselves about how new all of this is, and how revolutionary it is. Organizational leaders, instead of saying, “Hey what do you know about cloud? Oh, you don’t know anything? Okay, bye.” Need to say, “Hey let’s get learning! See what you can find out about the cloud that will help us meet our goals.” Because the reality is, most of us don’t know everything there is to know about the cloud. It is still new! And it is going to still be new for a long time!

If leaders don’t charge their teams with learning, these same leaders will have their business strategies singularly handled by vendors — well meaning as they may be. And the best solutions and the most remarkable features of ‘the cloud’ will never arrive. Innovation happens with a sense of ownership and dedication. This is less likely to happen when innovative work is attempted by 3rd parties who have ample room to over promise and under deliver.

The cloud is still new! Let’s respect that fact and don’t presume that the best solutions live elsewhere. Bring your teams into this new world and get ready to be blown away. Give them a chance to learn and innovate; don’t write them off. Sometimes the best innovations are right under our noses, but we can see them because we’re blinded by the glare of shinny, well-marketed solutions that can be low on substance.