‘The Cloud’ is Still New

It feels like folks have been talking about ‘the cloud’ forever. But levels of cloud utilization in the form of IaaS, PaaS, etc. have really only ramped up significantly in the last couple years. The tendency is to think that there are ‘cloud’ people who were just born knowing ‘cloud’ and that the chasm between ‘cloud’ and ‘on-prem’ is so great that the ‘on-prem’ folks simply won’t understand this new realm.

Fact is, ‘the cloud’ is still new. And no one is born knowing anything, especially not best-practices around cloud utilization, security, and architecture. Herein lies both risk and opportunity. If we can all just put down our pretensions around cloud know-how and get busy learning, we might actually be able to build, configure and secure our cloud environments in a way that delivers consistent, beautiful results.

But the first step is remind ourselves about how new all of this is, and how revolutionary it is. Organizational leaders, instead of saying, “Hey what do you know about cloud? Oh, you don’t know anything? Okay, bye.” Need to say, “Hey let’s get learning! See what you can find out about the cloud that will help us meet our goals.” Because the reality is, most of us don’t know everything there is to know about the cloud. It is still new! And it is going to still be new for a long time!

If leaders don’t charge their teams with learning, these same leaders will have their business strategies singularly handled by vendors — well meaning as they may be. And the best solutions and the most remarkable features of ‘the cloud’ will never arrive. Innovation happens with a sense of ownership and dedication. This is less likely to happen when innovative work is attempted by 3rd parties who have ample room to over promise and under deliver.

The cloud is still new! Let’s respect that fact and don’t presume that the best solutions live elsewhere. Bring your teams into this new world and get ready to be blown away. Give them a chance to learn and innovate; don’t write them off. Sometimes the best innovations are right under our noses, but we can see them because we’re blinded by the glare of shinny, well-marketed solutions that can be low on substance.

Security Hygiene is Boring and Critical

This has been said many times before by people many times more credentialed than me. There are sexy vulnerabilities out there that take considerable expertise to understand. Then there are vulnerabilities or configurations that are the equivalent of leaving your car door unlocked.

The calculation so often made goes like this: “it hasn’t happened before”, or “I’ll only be gone for a few minutes”.

Oddly, many who have an incredibly honed financial sense about them and who understand that ‘past performance does not equal equal future results’, have great difficulty extending this concept elsewhere. But nowhere is it more applicable than in security. Past performance does not equal future results! (Or you may have been hacked in the past and you don’t know it.)

The oversight that causes an organization to get hacked in the first place is likely something simple. Are you missing two-factor authentication? Are you still using a default login? Is your password “Spring2019” and do you use it everywhere? These are security concerns that don’t take heaps of expertise to understand; they are boring and critical.

Attackers don’t want to work hard to steal data or install ransomware, so they’re likely to look for simple vulnerabilities or poorly configured networks in order to get the job done. Don’t sweat the small stuff, sweat the simple stuff.

“The Pain Chronicles” by Melanie Thernstrom

Yesterday I finished reading “The Pain Chronicles: Cures, Myths, Mysteries, Prayers, Diaries, Brain Scans, Healing and the Science of Suffering” by Melanie Thernstrom. I’d heard about it in an episode of Radiolab titled “Loops”. (A very fascinating episode, btw.)

Thernstrom suffers from chronic pain. Her book is a journey through the history of pain; not just pain as we typically understand it, but its historical baggage. How we experience or interpret pain, for example, can change how we suffer in relation to it. And we interpret pain based on a host of contexts: religious, spiritual, through relationships, and our own understandings about ourselves, etc.

I don’t suffer from chronic pain, luckily (she discusses ‘luck’ in her book), but I do think it is important to try and understand what it might be like for people who do.

“The Pain Chronicles” reminds me of another book I read some time ago called, “The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression” by Andrew Solomon. Both Solomon and Thernstrom bring the reader with them in their search for healing.

For some reason, this kind of book, where the author researches the very thing that ails them, appeals to me. These authors don’t have the luxury of distancing themselves from their subject matter, yet they have to push forward anyway and seek objective observations whenever they can. This balancing act is what creates tension and makes their work much more meaningful.

I especially enjoy Thernstrom’s look at the placebo effect and a term I’d not heard of before, its evil twin, the nocebo effect. (The nocebo effect involves psychological and psychosomatic factors that can have a detrimental effect on one’s well-being.) Admittedly, with either effect, it only lasts as long as someone believes in its efficacy. So the challenge, at least in the case of the placebo, is to trick the self into continuing to affirm its reality, which is a tall order.

Thernstrom doesn’t have the luxury of getting a consistent benefit from the placebo effect. Neither do many chronic pain sufferers, but there is hope that some day the kind of understanding that comes from this research might lead to healing for chronic pain sufferers. This particular topic is one small piece of her very thorough narrative, however.

She follows several subjects on their respective journeys and, at times, provides fairly harsh criticisms of the doctors who treat them. These are as much criticisms of the doctors themselves as they are of how the medical profession as a whole addresses chronic pain.

Consider reading this book if you want to learn more about chronic pain and the experiences of those who suffer from it.