Hive Mind and a Missing Cerebellum

This morning I read an article in the Economist about a kid who was born without a cerebellum. Learning to walk, among other things, has proven to be much harder for him than it is for other kids his age. He has had more success than kids who merely have damaged cerebellums. This is partly because other parts of his brain have compensated for the part of his brain that is missing, which can be harder than if it is missing completely.

Another reason why he’s seen success and exceeded the expectations of medical experts is because of his parents. The Economist article illustrates how it is that his parents acted like a cerebellum for him. Repeatedly, they pushed him to stand up when he would have rather crawled. When he totters off a trail while walking through the zoo, they pull him back on. He’s momentarily agitated, not entirely sure why, but then he gets back on track, mentally.

This is an exaggerated case, but what it and other cases like it show is that if a human brain can use other brains to aid its processing power, it will. And that, as humans, we tend to rely on this distributed processing power. Whether this is in a family, a social group, or even in the workplace, I think it is important to understand our own distributed processing. If groups aren’t communicating or are in separate work silos, this will significantly reduce the value they bring to an organization. On the flip side, if these distributed systems are able to interface with each other, we can expect to see considerable value added to innovation supply chains.

We often relish rugged mental individualism, but by ignoring our distributed models of thinking, we decapitate our true potential of generating value within an organization. It is true that we can and should “put our heads together”. My son calls this “Hive Mind”.